The newly unearthed.

I have been exploring new blogs over the past several weeks, so here’s a grab bag of links to some of the more interesting things I’ve found – including older articles:

Hawks and Handsaws: “In defense of prescriptive labeling” is a defense of something I thought I was against, and comes dangerously close to changing my mind.

Socratic Form Micscropy: “Book Review: The Righteous Mind” is notable for its visual depiction of the replication crisis. Also, “When to worry about public debt” is notable because most people will either tell you we should be freaking out about public debt right now or that only right-wing crazies are freaking out about public debt; it’s relatively rare to ask just when a reasonable person should be worried.

Everything Studies: “A deep dive into the Harris-Klein controversy” is a refreshingly critical analysis of the dialogue in question, and of what norms should cover public discussion of politicized, scientific issues.

How did I not know this blog existed? Otium: “Psycho-conservativism: What it is, when to doubt it” and “Hoe cultures: A type of non-patriarchal society.”

In Due Course: “The problem with critical studies” which may or may not be exactly the same thing as postmodernism.

And on an entirely different note, The Angry GM on design rationale in the most controversial edition of Dungeons & Dragons.

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Is spinning poi cultural appropriation?

One way I can fool people in the real world into thinking I’m cool is by spinning fire.

The man in the above video – who is not me – is spinning props called poi, which is the Maori term for a traditional performance art that involves balls on strings.  Every once in a while, you’ll get someone who’ll tell you that white people shouldn’t spin poi, because it’s “cultural appropriation.” This is not a big deal, and it never goes anywhere because there is no substantial movement among the Maori themselves to stop white people from spinning poi.

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